PERSONALISED OESOPHAGUS CANCER SCREENING CONSULTATION

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SERVICE DESCRIPTION

SERVICE DESCRIPTION

  1. 1
    WHAT IS OESOPHAGUS CANCER?

    The oesophagus is a tube-like part of the digestive tract that connects the mouth with the stomach. Oesophageal cancer is a cancerous (malignant) tumour of this tube. Most of these cancers occur in the lower part of the oesophagus. More than 10,000 new cases are diagnosed in the United States every year.

  2. 2
    WHAT ARE THE CAUSES OF OESOPHAGUS CANCER?

    The cause is unknown. Certain risk factors, such as heavy alcohol and tobacco use, increase the chances of getting this cancer. It isn’t contagious. Acid reflux from the stomach that occurs for a long time can lead to changes in the lining of the oesophagus (Barrett’s oesophagus), which can, in some cases, lead to oesophageal cancer.

  3. 3
    WHAT INCREASES THE RISK OF OESOPHAGUS CANCER?

    Risk factors for oesophageal cancer include:

    • Being older than 65.
    • Being male.
    • Using any tobacco product, including cigarettes, chewing tobacco, and electronic cigarettes.
    • Drinking excessive amounts of alcohol.
    • Eating a diet that is lacking in fruits and vegetables.
    • Being overweight (obese).
    • Having damage to your oesophagus due to toxin or poison exposure.
    • Having conditions that cause damage or irritation to the oesophagus. These conditions include:
      • Acid reflux.
      • Barrett oesophagus.
      • Achalasia.
  4. 4
    WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OR SYMPTOMS OF OESOPHAGUS CANCER?

    Symptoms may include:

    • Trouble swallowing.
    • Chest or back pain.
    • Unintentional weight loss.
    • Fatigue.
    • Hoarse voice.
    • Coughing. This may include coughing up blood.
    • Vomiting. This may include vomiting up blood.
  5. 5
    HOW IS OESOPHAGUS CANCER DIAGNOSED?

    Your health care provider may ask about your medical history and perform a physical exam. Other tests that may be done include:

    • Barium swallow.
    • Endoscopic exam.
    • X-rays.
    • CT scan.
    • MRI.
    • Oesophagography.
    • A tissue sample test (biopsy).

    If oesophageal cancer is confirmed, it will be staged to determine its severity and extent. Staging is an assessment of:

    • The size of the tumour.
    • Whether or not the cancer has spread.
    • Where the cancer has spread.
  6. 6
    HOW IS OESOPHAGUS CANCER TREATED?

    Treatment for oesophageal cancer depends on the type and stage of the cancer. Treatment may include one or more of the following:

    • Surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible.
    • Chemotherapy. This treatment uses medicines to kill the cancer cells.
    • Radiation therapy to kill cancer cells.
    • Targeted drug therapy. These medicines block the growth and spread of cancer. This treatment is different from standard chemotherapy.
    • Immunotherapy. This is also called biological therapy. It is an emerging treatment that strengthens your body’s defence (immune) system to fight the cancer cells.

    Follow these instructions at home regarding oesophagus cancer:

    • Take medicines only as directed by your health care provider.
    • Maintain a healthy diet.
    • Consider joining a support group.
    • Seek advice to help you manage side effects of treatment.
    • Keep all follow-up visits as directed by your health care provider. This is important.
    • Do not use any tobacco products, including cigarettes, chewing tobacco, or electronic cigarettes. If you need help quitting, ask your health care provider.
    • Talk with your health care provider about limiting or avoiding alcohol.

    Contact a health care provider regarding oesophagus cancer if:

    • You are having a harder time swallowing or eating.
    • You notice new fatigue or weakness.
    • You lose weight unintentionally.
    • You have a fever.

    Get help right away if:

    • You have a sudden increase in pain.
    • You have trouble breathing.
    • You vomit blood or black material that looks like coffee grounds.
    • You have black stools.
    • You faint.

    DOs and DON’Ts in Managing Oesophageal Cancer:

    • DO treat chronic acid reflux to avoid precancerous conditions such as Barrett’s oesophagus.
    • DO ask about your prognosis. This cancer is hard to cure.
    • DO understand that nutrition is important before and after the operation. Eat high-calorie foods and nutritional supplements. A nutritionist (diet specialist) can help.
    • DO ask for help from support groups.
    • Do call your health care provider if you have pain with swallowing, trouble swallowing, or food getting stuck when eating.
    • DO call your health care provider if you cough up or vomit blood.
    • DO call your health care provider if you have shortness of breath and fever.
    • DO call your health care provider if you cannot eat and continue to lose weight.
    • DON’T smoke.
    • DON’T drink alcohol in excess.
    • DON’T miss follow-up appointments, such as with your primary care health care provider, surgeon, and oncologist (cancer specialist).

£75.00

£75.000

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