PERSONALISED MELANOMA SCREENING CONSULTATION

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SERVICE DESCRIPTION

SERVICE DESCRIPTION

  1. 1
    WHAT IS MELANOMA?

    Melanoma is a form of skin cancer that begins in melanocytes. Melanocytes are the skin cells that produce pigment. Melanoma starts as a mole on the skin and can spread to other parts of the body. If found early, many cases of melanoma are curable.

  2. 2
    WHAT ARE THE CAUSES OF MELANOMA?

    The cause is too much ultraviolet radiation from the sun, which hurts the skin. Higher risk is related to severe sunburns, light-coloured skin, blue eyes, blond hair, getting freckles, using tanning salons, and having many abnormal moles or family members with melanoma. People with dark skin can also get melanoma.

  3. 3
    WHAT INCREASES THE RISK OF MELANOMA?
    • Spending a lot of time in the sun, under a sunlamp, or in a tanning booth.
    • Having sunburn that blisters. The more blistering sunburns you have, the higher your risk of melanoma.
    • Spending time in parts of the world with more intense sunlight.
    • Living in a hot, sunny climate.
    • Having fair skin that does not tan easily.
    • Having had melanoma before.
    • Having a family history of melanoma.
    • Having more than 100 skin moles.
  4. 4
    WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OR SYMPTOMS OF MELANOMA?
    • ABCDE changes in a mole. ABCDE stands for:
      • Asymmetry. This means the mole has an irregular shape. It is not round or oval.
      • Border. This means the mole has an irregular or bumpy border.
      • Colour. This means the mole has multiple colours in it, including brown, black, blue, red, or tan.
      • Diameter. This means the mole is more than 0.2 in (6 mm) across.
      • Evolving. This refers to any unusual changes or symptoms in the mole, such as pain, itching, stinging, sensitivity, or bleeding.
    • A new mole.
    • Swollen lymph nodes.
    • Shortness of breath.
    • Bone pain.
    • Headache.
    • Seizures.
    • Visual problems.
  5. 5
    HOW IS MELANOMA DIAGNOSED?

    Your health care provider will take a tissue sample from the mole to examine under a microscope (biopsy). The biopsy will reveal whether melanoma has spread to deeper layers of the skin. Your health care provider will also order tests, including:

    • Blood tests.
    • Chest X-rays.
    • A CT scan.
    • A bone scan.
  6. 6
    HOW IS MELANOMA TREATED?

    You will have surgery to remove the cancer. Your lymph nodes may also be removed during the surgery. If melanoma has spread to other organs, such as the liver, lungs, bone, or brain, you will need additional treatment.

  7. 7
    HOW CAN MELANOMA BE PREVENTED?

    Melanoma may come back (recur) after it has been treated. Your risk of recurrence is higher if you had thick or ulcerated tumours or patches of tumours. Generally, the more advanced your melanoma, the more likely it will recur. You can help prevent melanoma from recurring by staying out of the sun, especially during peak midafternoon hours. When you are outdoors or in the sun:

    • Wear long sleeves, a hat, and sunglasses that block UV light when possible.
    • Apply a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher regularly.

    Take these precautions on cloudy days and in the winter, even if you will be outdoors for only a short period of time.

    Contact a health care provider regarding melanoma if:

    • You notice any new growths or changes in your skin.
    • You have had melanoma removed, and you notice new growth in the same location.

    DOs and DON’Ts in Managing Melanoma:

    • DO check your skin regularly for odd-looking new moles or changes in old moles. Call your health care provider if you find any.
    • DO have your health care provider do a complete check of your skin at least yearly.
    • DO avoid tanning booths.
    • DO a skin self-examination at least once monthly. Look at all moles on your body or any new moles that have developed.
    • DO use sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) more than 30, which provides the best protection.
    • DO remember that treating malignant melanoma requires a team effort, involving a primary care health care provider, dermatologist (skin specialist), oncologist (cancer specialist), and surgeon.
    • DO call your health care provider if you feel swollen glands or you have pain, fever, or drainage after surgery.
    • DON’T stay out in the sun for long periods, especially if you burn easily.
    • DON’T delay calling your health care provider if you see a mole that has changed or one that looks different.
  8. 8
    PERSONALISED CANCER SCREENING CONSULTATION

    A personalised cancer screening consultation is a meeting with a qualified consultant medical doctor to explain to you what does cancer screening mean and facilitate your understanding for the genomic and diagnostic tests that are that can help you to achieve your cancer screening and prevention objectives.

    Your consultant doctor will aim to answer all your questions regarding the cancer screening programmes and tests that could be beneficial for your overall health and wellbeing.

    It is recommended that you book a personalised cancer screening consultation with one of our recognised consultant medical doctors if you have a strong family history of cancer or you have one or more risk factors that may increase your risk of developing a specific type of cancer.

    If you are unable to attend to one of our outpatients’ clinics in London for your personalised cancer screening consultation, our consultant medical doctors can arrange to have your personalised cancer screening consultation by secure and encrypted voice conferencing or video conferencing, which can be done from the convenience of your home and using your smartphone.

£75.000

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