PERIODONTAL DISEASE

PERIODONTAL DISEASE

Periodontal disease, also called gum disease or gingivitis, is inflammation, infection, or both that affects the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth (periodontal tissue). Periodontal tissue includes the gums, the tissues (ligaments) that hold the teeth in place, and the tooth sockets (alveolar bones). Periodontal disease can affect tissue around one tooth or many teeth. If this condition is not treated, it can cause you to lose a tooth.

This condition is usually caused by plaque. Plaque contains harmful bacteria that can cause gums to become swollen and infected. If periodontal disease gets worse (progresses), it can also damage other supporting tissues.

Plaque can develop due to poor oral care, such as not brushing teeth enough, not visiting the dentist regularly, or eating and drinking too many sugary foods and beverages.

This condition is more likely to develop in people who:

  • Smoke.
  • Use tobacco.
  • Clench or grind their teeth.
  • Abuse substances.
  • Are going through the hormonal changes of puberty, menopause, or pregnancy.
  • Are under stress.
  • Are taking certain medicines, such as steroids, antiseizure medicines, or medicines to treat cancer.
  • Have diabetes.
  • Have poor nutrition.
  • Have a disease that interferes with the body’s disease-fighting system (immune system).
  • Have a family history of periodontal disease.

Symptoms of this condition include:

  • Red or swollen gums.
  • Bad breath that does not go away.
  • Gums that have pulled away from the teeth.
  • Gums that bleed easily.
  • Teeth that are loose or separating.
  • Pain when chewing.
  • Changes in the way your teeth fit together.
  • Sensitive teeth.

This condition is diagnosed with an exam of the tissue around your teeth. Your health care provider may also take an X-ray of your teeth and ask about your medical history.

Treatment for this condition depends on the extent of the disease, which is determined by a dental exam. Treatment may include:

  • Brushing and flossing regularly.
  • A deep dental cleaning that involves scraping the buildup of plaque and tartar from below the gum line (scaling and root planing). This may be needed if the disease progresses.
  • Antibiotic medicines. These may be taken by mouth (orally) or as a rinse.
  • Surgery, in some severe cases. This may involve a surgery to lift up the gums and remove tartar deposits or to reduce a pocket of periodontal disease (flap surgery). Surgery might also involve procedures that replace damaged areas and help healthy bone and tissue to grow (bone and tissue grafting).
  • Practice good oral hygiene:
    • Brush your teeth two times a day with a soft toothbrush.
    • Floss between your teeth every day.
    • Get regular dental exams.
  • If you were prescribed antibiotic medicine or a rinse, take or use it as told by your health care provider.Do not stop taking or using the antibiotic even if your condition improves.
  • Take over-the-counter and prescription medicines only as told by your health care provider.
  • Do not use any products that contain nicotine or tobacco, such as cigarettes and e-cigarettes. If you need help quitting, ask your health care provider.

Eat a well-balanced diet that includes plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, and lean protein.

  • Do not eat a lot of foods that are high in solid fats, added sugars, or salt.
  • Avoid beverages that contain a lot of sugar.
  • You have swelling in your face, neck, or jaw.
  • You have severe pain that does not get better with medicine.
  • You have a fever.
  • Periodontal disease, also called gum disease or gingivitis, is inflammation, infection, or both that affects the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth (periodontal tissue).
  • Practice good oral hygiene. Brush your teeth two times a day with a soft toothbrush. Floss between your teeth every day.
  • Do not use any products that contain nicotine or tobacco, such as cigarettes and e-cigarettes. If you need help quitting, ask your health care provider.
  • If you were prescribed antibiotic medicine or a rinse, take or use it as told by your health care provider.Do not astop taking or using the antibiotic even if your condition improves.

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