GLUTEN-FREE DIET FOR CELIAC DISEASE, ADULT

GLUTEN-FREE DIET FOR CELIAC DISEASE, ADULT

The gluten-free diet includes all foods that do not contain gluten. Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, rye, barley, and some other grains. Following the gluten-free diet is the only treatment for people with celiac disease. It helps to prevent damage to the intestines and improves or eliminates the symptoms of celiac disease.

Following the gluten-free diet requires some planning. It can be challenging at first, but it gets easier with time and practice. There are more gluten-free options available today than ever before. If you need help finding gluten-free foods or if you have questions, talk with your diet and nutrition specialist (registered dietitian) or your health care provider.

  • All fruits, vegetables, and meats are safe to eat and do not contain gluten.
  • When grocery shopping, start by shopping in the produce, meat, and dairy sections. These sections are more likely to contain gluten-free foods. Then move to the aisles that contain packaged foods if you need to.
  • Read all food labels. Gluten is often added to foods. Always check the ingredient list and look for warnings, such as “may contain gluten.”
  • Talk with your dietitian or health care provider before taking a gluten-free multivitamin or mineral supplement.
  • Be aware of gluten-free foods having contact with foods that contain gluten (cross-contamination). This can happen at home and with any processed foods.
    • Talk with your health care provider or dietitian about how to reduce the risk of cross-contamination in your home.
    • If you have questions about how a food is processed, ask the manufacturer.

Foods that list any of these key words on the label usually contain gluten:

  • Wheat, flour, enriched flour, bromated flour, white flour, durum flour, graham flour, phosphated flour, self-rising flour, semolina, farina, barley (malt), rye, and oats.
  • Starch, dextrin, modified food starch, or cereal.
  • Thickening, fillers, or emulsifiers.
  • Malt flavouring, malt extract, or malt syrup.
  • Hydrolysed vegetable protein.

In the U.S., packaged foods that are gluten-free are required to be labelled “GF.” These foods should be easy to identify and are safe to eat. In the U.S., food companies are also required to list common food allergens, including wheat, on their labels.

Grains

  • Barley, bran, bulgur, couscous, cracked wheat, Durham, farro, graham, malt, matzo, semolina, wheat germ, and all wheat and rye cereals including spelt and kamut. Cereals containing malt as a flavouring, such as rice cereal. Noodles, spaghetti, macaroni, most packaged rice mixes, and all mixes containing wheat, rye, barley, or triticale.

Vegetables

  • Most creamed vegetables and most vegetables canned in sauces. Some commercially prepared vegetables and salads.

Fruits

  • Thickened or prepared fruits and some pie fillings. Some fruit snacks and fruit roll-ups.

Meats and other protein foods

  • Any meat or meat alternative containing wheat, rye, barley, or gluten stabilizers. These are often marinated or packaged meats and lunch meats. Bread-containing products, such as Swiss steak, croquettes, meatballs, and meatloaf. Most tuna canned in vegetable broth and turkey with hydrolysed vegetable protein (HVP) injected as part of the basting. Seitan. Imitation fish. Eggs in sauces made from ingredients to avoid.

Dairy

  • Commercial chocolate milk drinks and malted milk. Some non-dairy creamers. Any cheese product containing ingredients to avoid.

Beverages

  • Certain cereal beverages. Beer, ale, malted milk, and some root beers. Some hard ciders. Some instant flavoured coffees. Some herbal teas made with barley or with barley malt added.

Fats and oils

  • Some commercial salad dressings. Sour cream containing modified food starch.

Sweets and desserts

  • Some toffees. Chocolate-coated nuts (may be rolled in wheat flour) and some commercial candies and candy bars. Most cakes, cookies, donuts, pastries, and other baked goods. Some commercial ice cream. Ice cream cones. Commercially prepared mixes for cakes, cookies, and other desserts. Bread pudding and other puddings thickened with flour. Products containing brown rice syrup made with barley malt enzyme. Desserts and sweets made with malt flavouring.

Seasoning and other foods

  • Some curry powders, some dry seasoning mixes, some gravy extracts, some meat sauces, some ketchups, some prepared mustards, and horseradish. Certain soy sauces. Malt vinegar. Bouillon and bouillon cubes that contain HVP. Some chip dips, and some chewing gum. Yeast extract. Brewer’s yeast. Caramel colour. Some medicines and supplements. Some lip glosses and other cosmetics.

The items listed may not be a complete list. Talk with your dietitian about what dietary choices are best for you.

  • Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, rye, barley, and some other grains. The gluten-free diet includes all foods that do not contain gluten.
  • If you need help finding gluten-free foods or if you have questions, talk with your diet and nutrition specialist (registered dietitian) or your health care provider.
  • Read all food labels. Gluten is often added to foods. Always check the ingredient list and look for warnings, such as “may contain gluten.”

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